Posts in Oracle
MJR Analytics Sessions at UKOUG Tech'18, Liverpool ACC, 3rd-5th December 2018
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Oracle Openworld may have San Francisco and the Moscone Center but you can’t beat Liverpool and the wind whipping in-off the Mersey in early December, and so we’re very pleased to be presenting once again at the UK Oracle User Group Technology Conference & Exhibition running next week at the Liverpool ACC, December 3rd-5th 2018.

Mark Rittman is presenting two sessions on Oracle’s new autonomous analytics and data warehousing platforms:

  • “Planning a Strategy for Autonomous Analytics & Data Warehouse Cloud”, Monday 3rd December 2:30 PM - 3:15 PM in Room 13

    ”As Oracle Analytics and Data Warehousing becomes self-driving and autonomous, the need for a strategy within your BI function becomes all the more important. How you deliver BI content to your users, the skills your developers now need and the most efficient way to manage your cloud estate are vital components of an autonomous cloud analytics strategy; this session will explain what’s changed, what’s significant and what are the implications of that change.

    By reference to today’s Oracle BI technology and applications and explaining how they now run autonomously as services in Oracle Cloud we’ll cover what are the key changes and its implications, what this means in terms of budgets and planning your investment, what are the key technology and process changes, what this means for team resourcing and roles - and just as importantly, what can be safely ignored for now.”

  • “BI Developer to Data Engineer with Oracle Analytics Cloud Data Lake Edition”, Tuesday 4th December 12:35 PM - 1:20 PM Room 11A

    ”In this session, we'll look at the role of the data engineer in designing, provisioning, and enabling an Oracle Cloud data lake using Oracle Analytics Cloud Data Lake Edition. We’ll also examine the use of data flow and data pipeline authoring tools and how machine learning and AI can be applied to this task. Furthermore, we’ll explore connecting to database and SaaS sources along with sources of external data via Oracle Data-as-a-Service. Finally we’ll delve into how traditional Oracle Analytics developers can transition their skills into this role and start working as data engineers on Oracle Public Cloud data lake projects.”

Mark Rittman will be at the event all week, so if you’ve got any questions about the topics we’re talking about in the two sessions or any aspect of Oracle Analytics, big data or Autonomous Data Warehouse either drop us an email beforehand, give us a call on +44 7866 568246 or just stop us in the corridor and we’ll be pleased to chat then.

Five Thoughts About Thomas Kurian’s Move to become CEO of Google Cloud Platform

The news broke late on Friday that Thomas Kurian is joining Google to become their new CEO for Google Cloud Platform. Five thoughts on Kurian’s move:

  1. It’s a smart move made by an exceptionally smart guy. Brave, as well, given the recent history between Oracle and Google but also not surprising given his drive and presumably point to prove. I met him a few times as part of Oracle’s ACE Director program and he’s the only software exec I know who can talk long-term strategy and vision one minute and then explain to you in-detail how it all works, and doing it all with great humility and courtesy.

  2. The fact that GCP is spoken-of as an also-ran at 10% market share whilst Oracle Cloud gets bundled in with “Next 10” shows what a mountain Oracle have to climb to even become a contender to compete with Microsoft and Amazon in the cloud business - and their insistence on only allowing their SaaS and PaaS apps to run in Oracle Cloud is a worrying parallel with the “Windows Tax” that Microsoft’s Office and Server products teams had to pay back in the Steve Ballmer Era, but with Oracle’s equivalent to Satya Nadella having lost the argument and jumped-ship

  3. But Oracle will survive and this has happened many times before - Ray Lane, Charles Philips, Tom Seibel, Mark Benioff all left and in many cases founded massively successful and competitive businesses, client-server went to internet architecture and then internet went to cloud, it’s all part of how businesses renew and people move on and up, and there’s plenty more smart (and most likely, smarter) people left in Oracle and Larry Ellison is still just as driven, competitive and on-top of his game.

  4. Look out for a very interesting (as in Brexit, interesting to watch but not to be part of) culture clash at GCP, with TK about the most top-down leader of a product development team I’ve ever seen and Google, famously, engineering-focused beanbag-friendly and bottom-up. Add to that the feelings most Googler’s have towards Oracle and TK will have his work cut-out early on to win the various teams over - my guess is that his work-ethic, technical chops and sheer ability will do just that and if this role is a success, Sergey and Larry may well have found their new Eric Schmidt but this time with technical skills to match theirs - but there’s always the chance that culture will prevail and he’ll be the next Marissa Meyer instead. No pressure there then..

  5. Expect to see GCP moving increasingly into SaaS B2B areas such as ERP, CRM, Financials and industry-vertical applications to complement their commoditised IaaS and PaaS cloud business and leveraging their massive GSuite and increasingly ChromeOS install base. Just think what they could do if they had access to all the world’s structured business transactional data as well as the unstructured search, email and spreadsheet data they have now - even more comprehensive and market-leading search, the world’s biggest and most valuable ML training set, and a business model that could provide these applications for free in exchange for exclusive access to that data and Google being your default search engine. That’s the real existential threat to Oracle; spending all their time trying to win an un-winnable cloud infrastructure war and then GCP coming along and making ERP, CRM and business applications essentially free.

Slides and Forbes.com Article from "Data Warehouse Like a Tech Startup with Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud"

One of the sessions we delivered at Oracle Openworld 2018 was “Data Warehouse Like a Tech Startup with Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud”, a presentation on the agility that Oracle Autonomous Data Warehouse Cloud (ADWC) can provide for teams within big, traditional businesses that would otherwise have to wait months to provision a physical Oracle data warehousing database. Moreover, ADWC instances can scale-up and scale-down as demand grows over time, and hits peaks such as Black Friday that are only short-term but in the past would have required companies to pay for and provision that level capacity all year round even though it sat idle most of the time.

The story behind the presentation was also written-up as a profile article in Forbes magazine by Oracle’s Jeff Erickson, with a great description of how MJR Analytics works on client projects.

To understand the type of agility Rittman is talking about, look at how he works with a client on a data analytics question: “You want to help them get inside their data to see trends and patterns” that they couldn’t otherwise see, he says. That might mean quickly bringing in public data or data from a data-as-a-service company and connecting outside analytics tools. “I work fast,” he says. With a retail customer, for example, “we’ll look to understand the lifetime value of a customer, their cycle of purchases, repeat purchases—all kinds of scenarios. And the whole thing will happen in a day. Much of it collaboratively with the client on a web conference.
— Jeff Erickson, "How A Big Business Can Use An Autonomous Database To Move Like A Startup"

But don’t just take our word for it, or even Forbes Magazine - our objective is for every client engagement to be referenceable where client confidentially allows, and you can check-out our first two testimonials from Colourpop and from Florence on our new Customers page … with a couple more to be added in the next week or so!