Oracle Big Data Cloud, Event Hub and Analytics Cloud Data Lake Edition pt.3

In this series of three blogs on Oracle Analytics Cloud Data Lake Edition I’ve setup an object store data lake in Oracle Cloud using Oracle Big Data Cloud and Oracle Storage Cloud, and ingested streams of real-time event data from IoT and social media sources into Oracle Cloud’s object storage service using Oracle Event Hub Cloud Service.

The event-stream data I staged into Storage Cloud was then copied into parquet files on HDFS and then presented out to BI and ETL tools through Big Data Cloud’s Thrift Server interface, so that now I’m ready, after a short diversion into defining the data engineer role that would typically work with this new product edition, to start exploring some of Oracle Analytics Cloud Data Lake Edition’s new data flow and predictive model preparation features.

The diagram below shows where OAC Data Lake Edition fits into my project architecture, performing the tasks of transforming and enriching the incoming dataset and then presenting my at-scale data out to end-users for analysis using OAC Data Lake Edition’s Data Visualization features.

Looking at the homepage within OAC Data Lake Edition I can see my two Hive tables listed within the dataset catalog, alongside other datasets I’d uploaded directly into OAC. This visual catalog of available datasets is also the new homepage interface that OBIEE12c 12.1.0.4.0 now adopts, with both cloud and on-premises versions of Oracle’s BI tools now relegating the old “Answers” homepage to something you have to dig around and specifically look for in favour of this more self-service Data Visualization starting page.

I’ll have to write an article on Answers and how powerful its interface is, and the full dimensional model it exposes from the Oracle BI Repository, in a blog post sometime in the future as it’s almost in danger of getting forgotten about.

Moving on though, the first transformation I need to do on all the incoming datasets is to take the timestamp column in each table and convert it to a format that OAC recognises as a valid TIMESTAMP datatype format, then convert those columns to TIMESTAMPs so that DV can automatically enable time-series analysis by day, month, quarter, hour and so on. I do that using a feature that’s also present in OAC Standard Edition, the lightweight data preparation interface that’s presented to users when they first add a new data source into OAC’s dataset catalog, shown in the screenshots below.

Where OAC Data Lake Edition gets really interesting right now both in terms of differences vs. the on-premises versions of OBIEE I used to use, and in terms of it’s “data engineering” potential, is with a feature called Data Flows.


Most self-service BI tools now have a basic data loading and data preparation capability today with Tableau Data Prep being one of the latest examples. Designed to handle more complex data prep use-cases than basic datatype changes and field-splitting, they give end-users the ability to do this type of work themselves rather than trying to do it in Excel or handing the work off to the IT department and having to wait days or weeks to get that data back.

Data Flows are a feature that’s been introduced since the original on-premises version of OBIEE12c that I last used when working out in consulting, and provide you with what’s effectively a lightweight, multi-step ETL tool that executes transformations using the BI Server’s Model Extension feature, introduced back when OBIEE12c first came out as the mechanism to enable on-the-fly data mashups between server-side and user-uploaded datasets.

Looking at the transformation operators available in OAC Data Lake Edition v4 there’s quite a few that apply to data lake and data engineering-type workloads including running Python statistical analysis scripts and predictive model training and model build; there’s also an operator for creating an Essbase Cube, with Essbase in this instance positioned as a fast ad-hoc analysis back-end for use with the data visualization part of OAC.

For now though there’s two transformation tasks I want to do with my Hive datasets; first, enrich the incoming social media data by analyzing the sentiment in each tweet and then writing the data plus this sentiment tagging back to the Oracle Big Data Cloud environment, so that I can then turn those sentiment tags into a score and create a data visualization showing who sends me the most tweets and how crazy they are overall.

The second data enrichment I wanted was on some Strava cycling workout data I’d uploaded directly into OAC using the CSV file upload facility; using the model train and build Data Flow operators I defined a model to predict how many “kudos”, the Strava equivalent to Facebook “likes”, I’d get for a given cycle workout with a number of different variables available to the model in order to make the prediction — for example, distance and elevation gain, map location, effort expended and so on.

Then, after running the model build step and looking at the predicted values and the actual ones for the remainder of the dataset not used for model training, you can see the predicted kudos values are fairly in-line with the ones I actually recorded for those rides.


Another feature that’s now in Oracle Analytics Cloud is automated data diagnostics, or Explain. Explain uses machine-learning libraries and that same model extension/XSA BI Server framework to help users quickly understand the value distribution and statistically correlated driving factors for a particular dataset, and learn which segments or cohorts have the highest predictive significance. Enabled by a bunch of extensions to BI Server logical SQL I used the feature first on the sentiment scoring I’d performed earlier on, and then on the steps data I’d brought into Oracle Big Data Cloud from my Fitbit device, after converting the numeric step counts into a text attribute by bucketing its values into low, medium and extreme bucket values.

This is pretty powerful stuff, with automated understanding and context-gaining about new datasets being one of the most user-enabling features I’ve seen arrive recently in BI tools with the best example of this being BeyondCore, now part of Salesforce Einstein. OAC lets the user pick the most useful of the Explain facts and driver insights and publish them to a Data Visualization dashboard like the one below, showing the most predictive and significant variables in my dataset that influence the steps I take each day.

Which leads neatly to the final “data at-scale” feature in OAC, the Data Visualization feature that in my case is querying the ingested, transformed and now enriched datasets I’ve got running on my Oracle Big Data Cloud instance alongside Oracle Event Hub Cloud and Oracle Analytics Cloud Data Lake Edition.


Thank you once again to the Oracle ACE Director program for providing access to Oracle Analytics Cloud Data Lake Edition, Oracle Big Data Cloud and Oracle Event Hub Cloud services over the past few weeks. If you’re looking to try these new services out there’s free trials available for most of Oracle’s Cloud products and many of the new features are also available in Oracle Data Visualization Desktop 12c and Oracle Business Intelligence 12c, both of which can be downloaded for training and evaluation under the OTN license scheme.


Wrapping-up this three part series on Oracle Analytics Cloud Data Lake Edition and Oracle Big Data Cloud I’d like to go back to the two (serious) questions I asked myself at the end of the previous post:

  1. Has OAC Data Lake Edition got anything actually to do with data lakes, and is it a useful tool for aspiring Oracle technology data engineers?
  2. How does it compare to my old favourite Oracle big data product Oracle Big Data Discovery, officially still available and not quite dead yet but existing in some strange zone where the on-premises version stopped getting updates a while ago and the cloud version is for sale but you can’t buy it unless you know the right person to ask and he’s actually gone to Cloudera

So has Oracle Analytics Cloud Data Lake Edition got much to do with actual “data lakes”? Well … it integrates with Oracle Big Data Cloud and apparently comes with an option to run those data flow transformation in Big Data Cloud’s Apache Spark environment, though to be fully-transparent I didn’t see that as an option when doing my evaluation so can’t comment on how well or not that works.

Like Oracle Big Data Discovery before it, OAC Data Lake Edition makes you structure your incoming event stream data with Hive table metadata before you can work with it, but that’s actually fairly standard practice with most data visualization tools that work with Hadoop and data lake environments.

Having Essbase in this product package, alongside the data lake functionality, did make me scratch my head a bit and wonder, “why?” — data lakes and Essbase are about as opposite as you can get in terms of target users and use-cases and I think this Data Lake Edition is as much about creating a product package and price point that’s mid-way between the OAC Standard and Enterprise Edition.

But there is some logic to having Essbase in this edition; it provides a set of easy-to-use loading and preparation tools for Essbase making it easier for customers new to that product to start using it, and Essbase with its latest hybrid ASO/BSO storage format is surprisingly scalable and blindingly-fast to query, a great potential back-end for enabling data analysis “at-scale” using Oracle Analytics Cloud’s data visualization features.

I also get the feeling that this initial v4 version of OAC Data Lake Edition is more of an initial first-cut release to get something out to customers, establish the product package and validate the roadmap and market assumptions. Oracle Analytics Cloud v5 isn’t too far off and I’d expect incremental improvements and new features in areas such as natural language processing and machine learning built-into the developer experience; I wouldn’t be surprised to see Oracle Big Data Preparation Cloud making its way into the product given its obvious fit and overlap with Data Lake Edition’s data prep features.

But where I really see an interesting future for OAC Data Lake Edition is when it starts to integrate product features and the development team from Oracle’s recent acquisition of Sparkline Data.

I came across SNAP, Sparkline‘s platform for building OLAP-style dimensional models over data lakes and cloud object storage layers about a year ago when researching analytics platforms at Qubit and quite frankly, it’s as revolutionary in terms of todays data lake analytics market as OBIEE (or the nQuire Server) was back in 1995 with its virtual data warehouse over application and data warehouse sources.

Take these two slides from the Sparkline website and imagine them as the future of Oracle Analytics Cloud analyzing event-streams and big data cloud-hosted datasets…

and you can see why I’m keen to see where Oracle Analytics Cloud Data Lake Edition goes over the next couple of years. I’m speaking on OAC Data Lake Edition at ODTUG KScope’18 in Orlando in just a couple of weeks time so come along if you’re there, it should be an interesting talk.